Tornado McGee

Image of od street in cityscape.

Prompt provided by: Writing Prompts by Writing.com app.
Place: a smokey poker room
Character: a young reporter
Object: a full spiral binder
Weather: a tornado approaches
Proofread: R.L. Campbell

Brentworth had already watched two different young men enter Hook’s Billiards in as many days. Not only had they seemed to be there for the first time ever, it very well could have been their first times in a any bar. Most of the patrons here were upwards of 60 years or more, but those two couldn’t have been any older than 20.

The first young reporter Brentworth had seen was all gung-ho and fast talking. He had been clean cut and wore a black sport-coat with a matching tie and slacks. Tailored. The hat could have been purchased ten minutes before entering Hook’s Billiards. He even had a white card tucked into the hats ribbon. “Press”, it read, printed. Somebody thought a lot about himself.

He had strode right through the door took a few paces and stopped to look around. He stifled a cough from the thick smoke, then walked straight on to Ole Jimmy tending the bar. As he approached the wizened barkeep, he flourished a small notepad and a pencil from his pockets.

Brentworth watched as Ole Jimmy just looked at the fellow and listened to the spew, never stopping his polishing of the drinking glass he held. Whatever that kid had said, it was not what Ole Jimmy was waiting for. The barkeep just shook his head and waved Mr. Press off. That was when Brentworths’s interest in the boy ended. He looked down at the Scotch in his hands and ignored whatever else would take place on the other side of the hidden window. He drank the Scotch in one gulp and poured another two-fingers.

The second young man came in the next day. No press tag tucked in the hat ribbon this time. No sports jacket either. The tie was loose and the shirt stained at the pits. He wore his hat pushed back about as far as it could go, and pin-striped slacks. He took in the room, much like Mr. Press had yesterday, and once again strode straight to Ole Jimmy. This time, instead of a notebook and pencil, a pack of shorts. He pulled one out and tapped it on the bar while asking Ole Jimmy something.

Just as the day before, Brentworth watched Ole Jimmy do no more than listen while polishing a drinking glass in his hands. When the fellow stopped talking, Ole Jimmy just shook his head, and Brentworth ignored the rest of things on that side of the two-way mirror. Time for a Scotch.

It was about 4 hours later, just before Five O’clock when he watched the third young reporter enter. This one look aged beyond his years, obviously young, but dressed… older. He wore no hat, or sport-coat, but his bow-tie was tied and matched his sleeve garter. He did have a buttoned up vest and what appeared to be wool britches. He wore glasses and his black hair was slicked down and back, parted at the middle.

As the young man entered, Brentworth watched him hold the door open as if waiting for someone behind him. After a short moment, the man glanced back as if he expected someone to be there. Nobody was there, and the young man released the door. His walk to the bar was tentative, and he took a stool three down from where Ole Jimmy polished another drinking glass. The young man gestured the number two with the fingers of one hand while dropping a few coins on the bar with the other.

Brentworth watched as Ole Jimmy put down his polishing towel and the drinking glass he had been rubbing. Ole Jimmy Hobbled over to the young man, took out a bottle of whiskey and a shot glass from under the bar. While Ole Jimmy poured, the young man leaned forward and spoke as if to not be over heard. Ole Jimmy leaned in to listen setting the bottle on the bar-top. The young man didn’t have much to say, and without waiting for a response, downed his shot. Ole Jimmy poured a second shot and when the young reporter looked up at him, Ole Jimmy nodded.

That was all Brentworth needed to see, he stood and pulled the curtain on his side of the two-way mirror closed just as Ole Jimmy pointed toward the door to the poker room. Brentworth took a bottle of whiskey and a second glass off a shelf between the mirror and door in one hand, while unlocking the door with his other. He settled into the booth table and placed a full spiral binder from the bench next to him onto the middle of the table.

He poured two glasses, whiskey for the new-comer, and Scotch for himself. His heart rate had increased for the anticipation. The young reporter who would come through that door in just moments must be the man Johnstein had trusted with the evidence, before his sudden and mysterious death. It must be him, otherwise Ole Jimmy would not have nodded and pointed the young fellow toward his door.

Tornado McGee’s trial was coming to town. Brentworth was the last secret witness. He couldn’t go to the district attorney, but that binder needed to be put into play. How else but through a young investigative reporter? That was Johnstein’s backup plan in case of death, and it was now up to Brentworth to enact it. He would do it. He would see that Johnstein’s friend got that evidence, and published it.

He took a few deep breaths and waited.